Alcoholics Anonymous For Alcohol Addicts support-groups

Alcoholics Anonymous And How It Begun


Continuously providing help and support to alcoholic addicted persons for 80 years is what Alcoholic Anonymous (AA) does best. Alcoholics Anonymous provides moral support to people that are trying to stop alcoholism and it started its operation in 1935. 12 steps were developed by the pair to go on the meetings of AA. They later also introduced the 12 traditions further to help define the purpose within the group. The original steps developed by the pair are still intact while many former alcoholics have credited the group for the help they received during their recovery.


Today, Alcoholics Anonymous has more than 2,000,000 active members all over the world and more than 50 thousand of support groups countrywide.


What To Expect From AA

For first timers, getting the courage to go to an AA meeting may pose a challenge. Opening up about your condition to people that you have just met is always the hard part for the new members. This feeling is felt by most of the people you'll encounter in the meetings. It must be understood that the organisation was founded by recovering alcoholics, and the model has served the community well even to this day. Everybody in the AA programs even those running them has gone through the program at some point, so they empathize with members.


The reception to the AA meeting is always amazing. While a discussion among new attendees is certainly encouraged it is not essential. The meeting participants know from experience that a new member may not find talking about themselves readily at first. After some time, they start feeling at home and find tremendous relief and healing through openly sharing their experiences.


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Closed Vs Open Gatherings

Attendance to a closed AA meeting is just available to recovering alcoholics or to individuals who are looking forward to learning more about how they can overcome their alcoholism.

Open meetings welcome also spouses, friends, and family members of the addicts. You may choose the type of meeting you feel comfortable attending. This is mainly because some people do not want to involve their families and friends in their struggle with alcoholism and the recovery process. These meetings can provide alcoholics the support needed by their loved ones and many are known to gain from this benefit.


The 12 Stages

These 12 Steps have been the backbone of the AA meetings. These steps are written one after another, but group members realise that in fact they go in a circle. The member needs to be comfortable with every step before they can move to the next stage.

Admitting that you have a problem and accepting that you need assistance is the first step. Following steps are consciously deciding you want to stop the habit; accepting your wrongs and those others did to you; correcting your mistakes; committing to keep on the road to recovery. To find out more about the 12 steps, go here.


AA Resistance

Withdrawal symptoms and other uncomfortable things one goes through as they try to quit alcohol abuse discourage many from attending the AA meetings. Most of the times, people avoid these meetings because

  • They do not believe these meetings will be helpful
  • They do not want to risk meeting someone they know
  • They are not certain whether they have a problem

These excuses may seem insurmountable, but the most important thing is to keep your eyes on what you want to achieve.

If you suspect that the problem exists, you're probably right. There will be no harm for you if you go to a meeting; besides, it can potentially save you from years of suffering caused by your addiction.


How To Find An Alcoholic Anonymous Group

There is always an AA group close to where you live. It's easy to attend these meetings because the groups tend to meet up regularly. Our meeting finder can help you to locate a group near you depending on whether you're looking for an open or closed meeting. Please contact 0800 246 1509 today so we can help you find a reliable AA group to help you today.