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The campaign against drugs that has the longest duration in the entire UK is Talk to Frank. Yet, has it halted anybody taking drugs?

A decade ago a police SWAT team slammed into a peaceful kitchen somewhere in the suburbs and modified the image of drugs education in the United Kingdom for always. Out went horrid notices of how medications could "mess you up" and sincere appeals to oppose the vile pushers prowling in each play area. Instead, wit and fun including games were embraced.


The first advert featured a boy calling the police snatch squad on his mother because she wanted to discuss drugs with him. There was also a new message Drugs are illegal. Talking about the isn't. So talk to Frank."


Frank Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

One can actually say that Frank which was a brain child of "Mother" ad firm became the new National Drugs Helpline Young people were meant to feel Frank was a helpful elder brother they could trust and from whom they could seek advice on illegal drugs. To become a familiar brand with youth in the UK, the Frank label has presented everything from the adventures of pablo the drug mule to a tour of a brain warehouse.


According to Justin Tindal, the creative director of Leo Burnett the ad agency, what is of more importance is the fact that no-one ever saw Frank physically, so it was difficult for mockers to pick on him or blame him for not treating the kids right. Many people have high regard for the YouTube spoof videos of Frank too. There is additionally no sign that Frank is a specialist of the services, something that makes it uncommon in the annals of government-supported movements.

Drugs instruction has progressed significantly since Nancy Reagan, and in the UK, the cast of Grange Hill asked adolescents to "Simply Say No" to drugs, a movement which numerous specialists now considers was counterproductive.


Like the Frank campaign, most European ads now focus on giving unbiased information so that young people can make up their own minds. In some places where there are still tough penalties for possession, ads showing prison bars or disappointed parents are still the norm. You play, you pay is a campaign that was launched in Singapore recently.

In the UK, the government has burned through millions on Above the Influence, a long-running movement that urges positive contrasting options to drug usage utilizing a blend of amusement and useful examples. The focus of the campaign is to talk to the youth in a language they understand, like the one ad showing a group of "stoners" stranded on a coach. But the drug fuelled descent into hell and scare tactics are still used by a surprisingly large number of campaigns around the world. A classic illustration is a current Canadian business, part of the DrugsNot4Me arrangement, which demonstrates an appealing, sure young lady's change into a shuddering and hollow eyed smash-up on account of "drugs."

Research that was done on a UK anti-drug campaign between 1999 and 2004 shows that describing the negative effects of abuse will often actually encourage young people "on the margins of society" to use drugs.


Frank made brand new ground - and received a lot of criticism from the conservative opposition politicians at that time - for being brave enough to put forward that substances might provide highs and lows.


An early online advertisement told people that cocaine made you feel on of the world.

It wasn't at all times simple to balance the message correctly. Matt Powell, the man behind the cocaine advertisement and then creative director of the digital agency, Profero, currently thinks he formed a too favourable estimate of the attention span of the typical person who browses the Internet. A few people might have stayed around for the animation's end to discover more regarding the undesirable effects. Establishing the integrity of the Frank brand by telling the youth the truth about drugs and their effects was the ultimate aim of the ad, Powell states.

The Home Office says 67% of youngsters in a study said they would swing to Frank in the event that they required drug guidance. 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. These figures provide proof that the Frank approach bears results.

However, just like every other anti-drugs campaign in the world , there's no evidence that Frank has actually stopped people from taking drugs.

During the decade that the Frank campaign was introduced, drug abuse figures in the UK have reduced by 9%; however, much of the decline has been attributed to a reduction in the use of cannabis as the more youth shun smoking tobacco.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a national drug education program that was established at the Home Office of the British Government and the Department of Health in 2003. It is envisioned to lessen the utilization of both lawful and illicit medications by instructing youngsters as well as teenagers about the potential impacts of medications and liquor. A lot of media campaigns have been put out on both the radio and the internet.


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Services

FRANK provides the following services for people who seek information and/or advice about drugs

  • A website
  • A confidential telephone number, available 24 hours a day
  • Email
  • A live private chat service that's available from 2 pm - 6 pm every day
  • Help in finding a rehab and treatment facility