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What Is Drug Addiction?

That chronic health condition where people cannot control the way they search for and make use of drugs irrespective of the fact that this can damage their health and alter their mental state forever is called Drug addiction. Some of those who use drugs develop some dangerous behaviours due to these alterations in the functioning of their brain. Addiction to drugs is a disease that can throw people into relapse too. Relapsing is when a person starts to use drugs again after he/she attempted to quit.


Drug dependency grows from a deliberate choice to take a substance. After some time, a man's capacity to pick not to do as such becomes compromised. Seeking out and using drugs becomes an obsession. The increased length of time that the person's brain relies on drugs to function is the cause of this. The parts of the brain that control reward and motivation, learning and memory, and self control are all significantly affected by addiction.

Addiction is a sickness that influences both the mind and conduct.


Is There Treatment For Drug Dependency?

There is, but it is a long journey. Since dependency is a chronic illness, individuals cannot just quit using the substances for a day or two and be cured of it. For most patients, long term often repeated care is needed to help them stop using and continue on to get their lives back.


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Enslavement treatment must help the individual to the accompanying

  • Stopping to require using the drug
  • Remaining clean
  • achieve more productivity in the society in general and in the family and workplace in particular

Values Of Successful Rehabilitation

In light of logical research since the mid-1970s, the accompanying key standards ought to frame the premise of any compelling treatment program

  • Dependency is an intricate, but treatable illness which affects the functioning of the brain and behaviour.
  • No single treatment is appropriate for everybody.
  • Individuals must be able to access treatment quickly.
  • Treatment deals with more than just drug use, addressing all of the patient's needs.
  • It's important to remain in treatment long enough.
  • Psychological and other behaviour remedies are used in treating the habit.
  • A crucial part of treatment is medication, particularly when combined with behavioural therapy.
  • A treatment plan must be evaluated frequently and adapted to suit the changing requirements of the patient.
  • Treatment should deal with other potential mental disorders.
  • The first stage, medically assisted detoxification, is only the beginning of treatment.
  • Patients do not necessarily enrol for treatment by choice.
  • Medical personnel must supervise any medications taken during the rehab period.
  • The treatment programs must ensure that patients are tested for tuberculosis, hepatitis B and C, HIV/AIDS, and other infectious ailments, while they should also be informed about the best way to avoid contacting those.

How Is Substance Dependency Treated?

Effective treatment consists of several steps

  • Detoxification (the way a body is cleaned of toxins and drug residue)
  • behavioural counselling
  • medication for addictions to opioids, tobacco, or alcohol
  • Diagnosis and management mental illness associated with drug addiction such as hopelessness and nervousness
  • long-term after treatment care to avoid relapse

Using a wide range of treatments tailored to the needs of the patient is a key to success.


Treatment ought to incorporate both therapeutic and emotional well-being services as required. The follow-up can compromise family- or community-based recovery support systems.


How Is Medication Employed In Substance Dependency Treatment?

The treatment of co-occurring health issues, avoidance of relapse and amelioration of the withdrawal symptoms are some of the cases where medications are needed.

  • Withdrawal Medicines help in decreasing withdrawal side effects amidst detoxification. Detoxification is not in itself "treatment," rather just the initial phase all the while. Patients normally go back to the use of drugs if their treatment is not continued after detoxification. One research of treatment centres found that drugs were utilized as a part of just about 80 percent of detoxifications (SAMHSA, 2014).
  • Preventing A Relapse The cravings for drugs can be lowered and normal brain functions restored in the patients with the help of medications. Medications are accessible for management of opioid (heroin, prescription pain relievers), tobacco (nicotine), and alcohol dependence. Drugs that can counter the effects of enhancing (uppers) like (cocaine, crystal meth) and cannabis (marijuana) are being developed by scientists. It's really common for addicts to use more than one drug and they will need treatment for each substance.

How Are Behavioural Therapies Used To Treat Drug Addiction?

Psychotherapy assists addicts to

  • Change their behaviour toward and the way the think about their drug use
  • Upturn healthy life abilities
  • Continue with varying forms of treatment like medication

A patient can get treatment in several different environments using different approaches.

Outpatient behavioural treatment involves different programs designed for patients with an organised calendar of regular meetings with a counsellor for behavioural health. Individual and group therapy, or a combination of both are involved in most treatment programs.


Treatments available in some of these treatment sessions address psychological issues like

  • cognitive-behavioural therapy, which helps patients perceive, dodge and adapt to the circumstances in which they are destined to utilise drugs
  • Multidimensional family treatment created for young people with drug abuse issues and their families which addresses a scope of impacts on their drug mishandle designs and is intended to enhance general family working
  • motivational interviewing, that makes the most of a person's willingness to alter their behaviour and start treatment
  • Motivational incentives that work by positively reinforcing like rewards to help the patient's urge for drugs reduce

Initially, a patient will receive many hours of treatment and will have to frequently attend clinical sessions if they opted for the outpatient therapies. regular outpatient treatment that involves fewer meeting hours few days of the week after the intensive treatment in the bid to ensure a sustained healing process.


For a patient with severe problems, including coexisting conditions, inpatient or residential treatment is very effective. 24-hour planned and organised care system, coupled with proper medical care and safe housing are given in residential treatment facilities that are licensed. An inpatient treatment facility can make use of different therapeutic approaches and they are usually aimed at assisting patients to lead a substance-free, crime-free life after completing the treatment.


Some examples of inpatient treatment environments are

  • A therapeutic community that is a very structured programme in which a patient stays at a residence, usually for 6 months to a year. The entire community, comprising treatment employees and patients in recovery, act as essential agents of change, affecting the patient's understanding, attitude, as well as conduct linked with substance use.
  • Shorter-term inpatient treatment that usually concentrates on detoxification and offering initial in-depth counselling and preparation for treatment in community-based environments.
  • There are also recovery housing services aimed at giving a patient a place to stay in the short term as they recuperate from treatment in other establishments. People can move onto independent life through recovery housing - it assists them for example to learn financial management or job hunting, while linking them to community based support groups.

Challenges Of Re-Entry

Habitual intake of drugs alters the normal functions of the brain, and various things can cause one to have a burning desire to take the drugs. It is key for patients in treatment, particularly those treated at prison or inpatient facilities, to learn how to identify, steer clear of, and deal with triggers that they are most likely to experience after treatment.